• Barber Vintage Motorsports Museum - Birmingham, Alabama

    Barber Vintage Motorsports Museum - Birmingham, Alabama

    Get ready for motorcycle mania! It's the only way to describe a visit to the Barber Vintage Motorsports Museum in Alabama.

  • Barber Vintage Motorsports Museum - Birmingham, Alabama

    Barber Vintage Motorsports Museum - Birmingham, Alabama

    Established in 1995, this museum holds the world's largest collection of motorcycles - a Guinness World Record!

  • Barber Vintage Motorsports Museum - Birmingham, Alabama

    Barber Vintage Motorsports Museum - Birmingham, Alabama

    This five-floor building boasts a massive collection of over 1,600 vintage and modern motorcycles. Each floor chronicles their evolution from the turn of the past century to today. Over 200 manufacturers are represented, including some of the most popular European and British brands.

  • Sixteenth Street Baptist Church - Birmingham, Alabama

    Sixteenth Street Baptist Church - Birmingham, Alabama

    The 16th Street Baptist Church bombing was an act of white supremacist terrorism which occurred at the African American 16th Street Baptist Church in Birmingham, Alabama on Sunday, September 15, 1963, when four members of the Ku Klux Klan planted at least 15 sticks of dynamite attached to a timing device beneath the front steps of the church. It was a tragedy and a turning point in the Civil Rights movement. Four little girls lost their lives in the blast.

  • Birmingham Civil Rights Institute - Birmingham, Alabama

    Birmingham Civil Rights Institute - Birmingham, Alabama

    This historic museum traces the journey of the civil rights advocates of the 1950s and 60s, who changed the course of American history. The struggle for equality for Black Americans is chronicled here, from the Jim Crow laws in the 1800s to the freedom rides, sit-ins and demonstrations of the 1960s.

  • Birmingham Civil Rights Institute - Birmingham, Alabama

    Birmingham Civil Rights Institute - Birmingham, Alabama

    In 1963 Martin Luther King Jr. was arrested and sent to jail because he and others were protesting the treatment of blacks in Birmingham, Alabama. A court had ordered that King could not hold protests in Birmingham. It was from this jail cell that Martin Luther King, Jr. completed work on one of the seminal texts of the American Civil Rights Movement - Letter From Birmingham Jail. “Injustice anywhere is a threat to justice everywhere. We are caught in an inescapable network of mutuality, tied in a single garment of destiny."

  • Edmund Pettus Bridge - Selma, Alabama

    Edmund Pettus Bridge - Selma, Alabama

    The Edmund Pettus Bridge, now a National Historic Landmark, was the site of the brutal Bloody Sunday beatings of civil rights marchers during the first march for voting rights. The televised attacks were seen all over the nation, prompting public support for the civil rights activists in Selma and for the voting rights campaign. After Bloody Sunday, protestors were granted the right to continue marching, and two more marches for voting rights followed. Less than five months after the last of the three marches, President Lyndon Johnson signed the Voting Rights Act of 1965.

  • Edmund Pettus Bridge - Selma, Alabama

    Edmund Pettus Bridge - Selma, Alabama

    Reflecting on history and remembering those whose courage and bravery forever changed the world.

  • Rosa Parks - Montgomery, Alabama

    Rosa Parks - Montgomery, Alabama

    Civil rights activist Rosa Parks refused to surrender her bus seat to a white passenger, spurring the Montgomery boycott and other efforts to end segregation. The Montgomery Bus Boycott took place from December 5, 1955, to December 20, 1956, and is regarded as the first large-scale demonstration against segregation in the U.S.

  • Dexter Avenue King Memorial Baptist Church - Montgomery, Alabama

    Dexter Avenue King Memorial Baptist Church - Montgomery, Alabama

    In 1954, Martin Luther King, Jr. began his first full-time pastorship at Dexter Avenue Baptist Church in Montgomery, Alabama. While at Dexter, King became president of the Montgomery Improvement Association (MIA) and led his congregation and the black community during the Montgomery bus boycott.

  • Dexter Avenue King Memorial Baptist Church - Montgomery, Alabama

    Dexter Avenue King Memorial Baptist Church - Montgomery, Alabama

    The church building was designated a national historic landmark on June 3, 1974, and Montgomery added the church to its list of historic sites on July 13, 1976. Today, thousands of national and international tourists annually visit the Church to be inspired by and educated on the history and Dr. King’s role in the Montgomery Bus Boycott.

  • Dexter Avenue King Memorial Baptist Church - Montgomery, Alabama

    Dexter Avenue King Memorial Baptist Church - Montgomery, Alabama

    If walls could talk...Martin Luther King, Jr. organized the Montgomery Bus Boycott in this basement office of the Dexter Avenue Baptist Church.

  • First White House of the Confederacy - Montgomery, Alabama

    First White House of the Confederacy - Montgomery, Alabama

    The First White House of the Confederacy was the executive residence of President Jefferson Davis and family while the capital of the Confederate States of America was in Montgomery, Alabama.

  • First White House of the Confederacy - Montgomery, Alabama

    First White House of the Confederacy - Montgomery, Alabama

  • Alabama State Capitol - Montgomery, Alabama

    Alabama State Capitol - Montgomery, Alabama

    Completed in 1851, the Alabama State Capitol is a National Historic Landmark and a museum of state history and politics.

  • Alabama State Capitol - Montgomery, Alabama

    Alabama State Capitol - Montgomery, Alabama

    The Confederacy began in the original Senate chamber, and the Selma to Montgomery 1965 Voting Rights March ended on the street in front of the building. Today, the governor and other executive branch officers reside in the Capitol.

  • Alabama State Capitol - Montgomery, Alabama

    Alabama State Capitol - Montgomery, Alabama

    The dome interior as seen from the floor of the rotunda.

  • Dexter Parsonage Museum - Montgomery, Alabama

    Dexter Parsonage Museum - Montgomery, Alabama

    Visitors to the Dexter Parsonage Museum will experience the actual residence where Dr. King and his young family lived between 1954 and 1960.

  • Tuskegee Airmen National Historic Site - Tuskegee, Alabama

    Tuskegee Airmen National Historic Site - Tuskegee, Alabama

    The Tuskegee Airmen were the first black military aviators in the U.S. Army Air Corps (AAC), a precursor of the U.S. Air Force. Trained at the Tuskegee Army Air Field in Alabama, they flew more than 15,000 individual sorties in Europe and North Africa during World War II. Their impressive performance earned them more than 150 Distinguished Flying Crosses, and helped encourage the eventual integration of the U.S. armed forces.

  • Little Rock Central High School National Historic Site - Little Rock, Arkansas

    Little Rock Central High School National Historic Site - Little Rock, Arkansas

    Little Rock Central High School is recognized for the role it played in the desegregation of public schools in the United States. The nine African-American students' persistence in attending the formerly all-white Central High School was the most prominent national example of the implementation of the May 17, 1954 Supreme Court decision Brown v. Board of Education. I was fortune enough to go on a ranger led tour. This is the only way for visitors to step inside the high school, where regrettably photography is not permitted.

  • Arkansas State Capitol - Little Rock, Arkansas

    Arkansas State Capitol - Little Rock, Arkansas

    The Little Rock Nine Memorial pays homage to the nine African American students who integrated Little Rock Central High School in 1957. These courageous young adults are immortalized in a striking memorial located on the grounds of the Arkansas State Capitol in Little Rock.

  • Arkansas State Capitol - Little Rock, Arkansas

    Arkansas State Capitol - Little Rock, Arkansas

    Entrance into the Arkansas Senate.

  • Arkansas State Capitol - Little Rock, Arkansas

    Arkansas State Capitol - Little Rock, Arkansas

    The Arkansas State Capitol is equally rich in history, craftsmanship and architectural excellence.

  • William J. Clinton Presidential Library - Little Rock, Arkansas

    William J. Clinton Presidential Library - Little Rock, Arkansas

    The William J. Clinton Presidential Center and Park, located on the banks of the Arkansas River in Little Rock, Arkansas, attracts hundreds of thousands of visitors from around the world to its grounds each year.

  • William J. Clinton Presidential Library - Little Rock, Arkansas

    William J. Clinton Presidential Library - Little Rock, Arkansas

    “I am going to focus like a laser beam on this economy." – President Clinton, November 4, 1998 As Bill Clinton took office following the 1992 election, the United States faced rising interest rates and large government deficits. He proposed a new three part economic system composed of balancing the federal budget for the first time in a generation, making investments in technology, and opening new markets to products from the United States. The country saw its largest peacetime economic expansion in history and was met with record surpluses and higher income for all economic classes.

  • William J. Clinton Presidential Library - Little Rock, Arkansas

    William J. Clinton Presidential Library - Little Rock, Arkansas

    Opened in 2004, the Center is home to the Little Rock offices of the Clinton Foundation, the William J. Clinton Presidential Library and Museum, and the University of Arkansas Clinton School of Public Service.

  • President William Jefferson Clinton Birthplace Home National Historic Site - Hope, Arkansas

    President William Jefferson Clinton Birthplace Home National Historic Site - Hope, Arkansas

    "I still believe in a place called Hope." On August 19, 1946, Virginia Blythe gave birth to her son, William Jefferson Blythe, III. Named for his father who died before he was born, he grew up to become William Jefferson Clinton - the 42nd president of the United States. In this house, he learned many of the early lessons that defined his life and his presidency.

  • President William Jefferson Clinton Birthplace Home National Historic Site - Hope, Arkansas

    President William Jefferson Clinton Birthplace Home National Historic Site - Hope, Arkansas

    Bill Clinton's childhood room.

  • Junction Bridge - Little Rock, Arkansas

    Junction Bridge - Little Rock, Arkansas

    Junction Bridge has served as a backdrop to both Little Rock and North Little Rock’s skylines for over 100 years. Today, this vital landmark has been transformed into a pedestrian bridge that will serve as one of the state’s premiere destinations for both tourists and locals to view the Arkansas River and discover the heart of Central Arkansas’ flourishing activities.

  • Hot Springs National Park - Hot Springs, Arkansas

    Hot Springs National Park - Hot Springs, Arkansas

    Water. That's what first attracted people, and they have been coming here ever since to use these soothing thermal waters to heal and relax. Rich and poor alike came for the baths, and a thriving city built up around the hot springs. Together nicknamed "The American Spa," Hot Springs National Park today surrounds the north end of the city of Hot Springs, Arkansas. Come discover it for yourself.

  • Buckstaff Baths - Hot Springs, Arkansas

    Buckstaff Baths - Hot Springs, Arkansas

    Take a traditional bath at the Buckstaff Baths, a park concessioner since 1912. This experience with individual tubs was patterned after European spas in the early 1900s. Enjoy a relaxing bath the same way visitors to Hot Springs did 50 years ago.

  • Superior Bathhouse Brewery - Hot Springs, Arkansas

    Superior Bathhouse Brewery - Hot Springs, Arkansas

    Superior Bathhouse Brewery is the worlds first brewery or distillery to utilize thermal spring water as one of its main ingredients.

  • Evergreen Plantation - Edgard, Louisiana

    Evergreen Plantation - Edgard, Louisiana

    Fans of Quentin Tarantino's blockbuster Django Unchained will instantly recognize this southern plantation. Evergreen is the most intact plantation complex in the South with 37 buildings on the National Register of Historic Places, including 22 slave cabins in their original, double row configuration. Today, Evergreen remains a privately owned, working sugar cane plantation. It is located on the west bank of the Mississippi River, between New Orleans and Baton Rouge.

  • Evergreen Plantation - Edgard, Louisiana

    Evergreen Plantation - Edgard, Louisiana

  • French Quarter - New Orleans, Louisiana

    French Quarter - New Orleans, Louisiana

    In the early 1960's, New York City began referring to its music culture and talking about jazz in "The Big Apple." To counter that, in the late 1960's, Betty Guillaud, a Times-Picayune columnist, began referring to New Orleans as "The Big Easy," where jazz was born. Today, that heritage is reflected by its round-the-clock nightlife, vibrant live-music scene and spicy, singular cuisine celebrating its history as a melting pot of French, African and American cultures.

  • Mardi Gras World - New Orleans, Louisiana

    Mardi Gras World - New Orleans, Louisiana

    Come explore the working warehouse of Mardi Gras World, where the grandest floats and sculptures are made!

  • The Spotted Cat Music Club - New Orleans, Louisiana

    The Spotted Cat Music Club - New Orleans, Louisiana

    The quintessential Jazz Club of New Orleans. Located in the heart of the enchanted Faubourg Marigny, just steps away from the hustle and bustle of the French Quarter, it has been and remains the local favorite for live New Orleans music ranging from Traditional and Modern Jazz, Blues, Funk, Klezmer, and so much more. Patrons are sure to enjoy listening to local musicians playing their hearts out.

  • Nottoway Plantation - White Castle, Louisiana

    Nottoway Plantation - White Castle, Louisiana

    Stunning Nottoway Plantation is the South's largest antebellum mansion. A dramatic, multi-million dollar renovation has restored this historic plantation to her days of glory, as well as adding luxury resort amenities and corporate and social event venues.

  • Nottoway Plantation - White Castle, Louisiana

    Nottoway Plantation - White Castle, Louisiana

  • Nottoway Plantation - White Castle, Louisiana

    Nottoway Plantation - White Castle, Louisiana

  • Mississippi Welcome Sign - Vicksburg, Mississippi

    Mississippi Welcome Sign - Vicksburg, Mississippi

    Music figures prominently in the state’s heritage, whether blues, rock ‘n’ roll or country. The Mississippi Blues Trail recognizes blues pioneers, including Albert King, Muddy Waters, Sam Cooke and B.B. King.

  • Mississippi State Capitol - Jackson, Mississippi

    Mississippi State Capitol - Jackson, Mississippi

    The Mississippi State Capitol has been the seat of the state’s government since 1903. The building is located on the site of the old state penitentiary and was designed by Theodore Link, an architect from St. Louis, Missouri. The State Capitol is the third capitol building constructed in Jackson. The first building was completed in 1822 and no longer stands. The second building was completed in 1839, served as the Capitol until 1903, and today is the Old Capitol Museum. Upon the Capitol’s dedication in 1903, Governor A.H. Longino said of the new building, “... give to the people a Capitol building which shall be a reflex of the State’s public spirit, pride and integrity.”

  • Mississippi State Capitol - Jackson, Mississippi

    Mississippi State Capitol - Jackson, Mississippi

    The Mississippi State Capitol rotunda.

  • Vicksburg National Military Park - Vicksburg, Mississippi

    Vicksburg National Military Park - Vicksburg, Mississippi

    Vicksburg National Military Park commemorates one of the most decisive Civil War battles in American history: the campaign, siege, and defense of Vicksburg. Located high on the bluffs, Vicksburg was a fortress guarding the Mississippi River. It was known as "The Gibraltar of the Confederacy." Its surrender on July 4, 1863, coupled with the fall of Port Hudson, Louisiana, divided the South, and gave the North undisputed control of the Mississippi River. Today, the battlefield at Vicksburg is in an excellent state of preservation. It includes 1,325 historic monuments and markers, 20 miles of reconstructed trenches and earthworks, a 16 mile tour road, an antebellum home, 144 emplaced cannons, the restored Union gunboat USS Cairo, and the Vicksburg National Cemetery.

Deep South - Alabama, Arkansas, Louisiana, Mississippi